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DENSITY IS GOOD AND AFFORDABLE LIVING IS A RIGHT

Because:

  • When we allow more residential development—of all sizes and character—we allow new residents to join our neighborhoods and existing residents to afford to stay.
  • When the supply of homes increases, it addresses the demand for more homes in Denver and relieves the pressure on rising housing costs.
  • Greater concentrations of residents attract more businesses and services to our communities—increasing options, opportunities, and quality of life for all.
  • Density supports more walkable, bikeable, and transit-rich neighborhoods, allowing Denverites to meet their daily needs without relying on a car.
  • When people of all backgrounds and incomes live close to one another, neighbors grow stronger bonds and communities thrive.

We advocate for plans, policies, projects, and programs that:

  • Encourage new home construction in all of Denver’s neighborhoods, for people and families of all income levels.
  • Put housing for people before “housing” (parking) for cars.
  • Plan for the Denver of tomorrow, not the Denver of today or yesterday.
  • Allow individuals and families to decide what a home means to them, whether it’s 300 square feet or 3,000.

THE FREEDOM TO MOVE IS ESSENTIAL

Because:

  • Dense cities demand efficient and reliable transit, walking, and biking options, and Denver deserves a better transportation network that supports and nurtures a growing city.
  • Owning a car should not be a prerequisite to living in Denver.
  • Traveling on foot, bike, and transit should not only be convenient, but safe, attractive, reliable, and cost-effective.
  • Public streets are for everyone’s use—not just those who drive and park their cars.
  • Reliable and efficient transit systems relieve residents of the significant financial burdens associated with car-dependency.

We advocate for plans, policies, projects, and programs that:

  • Prioritize pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit riders over cars.
  • Create safe and functional streets based on that prioritization.
  • Expand and enhance reliable transit options in Denver.
  • Eliminate subsidies for driving and car ownership.

ANTI-GROWTH TENDENCIES ARE EXACERBATING GENTRIFICATION AND DISPLACEMENT

Because:

  • Rising rental costs and home values have to be addressed by an increase in the supply of all types of homes.
  • When neighborhoods say “no” to home construction, they are denying current residents additional options for attainable homes, and denying newcomers a home in their desired neighborhood.

We advocate for plans, policies, projects, and programs that:

  • Expand affordable and market-rate home development throughout the city.
  • Achieve an equitable distribution of attainable homes in all of Denver’s neighborhoods.

DENSIFYING EXISTING NEIGHBORHOODS IS THE ONLY SUSTAINABLE GROWTH

Because:

  • Denver will not stop growing, so we must choose if new residents will be accommodated within our existing neighborhoods, or at the sprawling fringes of our metro area.
  • Compact development, where residents have shared access to transportation, infrastructure, and city services, is more ecologically, environmentally, and fiscally sustainable.

We advocate for plans, policies, projects, and programs that:

  • Reduce our collective impact on the environment and its natural resources.
  • Incentivize the development of sustainable building forms that consume less of our resources.

WHEN NEIGHBORHOODS SAY “YES” TO HOMES AND BUSINESSES, DENVER’S COMMUNITY GROWS STRONGER

Because:

  • Allowing residents to meet their daily needs without traveling long distances creates stronger bonds with neighbors, merchants, and other community members.
  • Vibrant neighborhoods with diverse businesses and services are able to support the needs of residents of all ages, and older adults can age in place.
  • Diverse and welcoming communities are thriving communities.

We advocate for plans, policies, projects, and programs that:

  • Promote mixed-use developments (homes, businesses, and community services).
  • Support diverse, mixed-income, mixed-tenure neighborhoods.
  • Encourage non-traditional housing arrangements, such as co-ops and community land trusts.